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Sorority

Critic:

Jason Knight

|

Posted on:

8 Mar 2022

Film Reviews
Sorority
Directed by:
James Webber
Written by:
James Webber
Starring:
Sophie Kennedy Clark, Emily Haigh, Kate Dickie, Sam Gittins, Hannah Lee
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An emotional story about the lives of two sisters.

 

Harriet (Clark) and Sarah (Haigh) are siblings who have reached a point in their lives where there are going to be dramatic changes. Harriet has decided to move to Manchester and Sarah has been accepted to university. Although both are happy with their decisions, there are also complications as Harriet breaks up with her long-time boyfriend Andrew (Gittins) and Sarah ends up having to find another place to live.

 

This is a moving drama that deals with themes of sisterhood, family, loss, regrets, tragedies, support and reconciliation. The screenplay follows the joys, struggles and challenges the two sisters go through and acknowledges that the bond between them is very strong. Sarah and Harriet spend a great deal of time together, enjoying themselves, discussing their lives, their past, their future, helping each other and they end up crossing paths with their estranged mother (Dickie). The narrative takes place over the course of a weekend, indicating that a great deal can take place over a short period of time. There are scenes of happiness, scenes of confrontation and scenes of forgiveness.

 

Clark and Haigh deliver great performances as two sisters who grew up together and care deeply for each other and are now facing significant changes in their lives. Gittins plays his part very well as Harriet's partner, who is quite upset about their break-up and who also shares a traumatic experience with her that took place in the past. Dickie is also great as the mother who made mistakes in the past and is willing to make up for them. The protagonists are individuals who each have their own challenges to face and the performances are dramatic and emotional.

 

Webber does a superb job with the directing and the use of slow motion is beautiful. The voice-over creates drama and the cinematography by Lorenzo Levrini is wonderful. The dramatic score by Derek Kirkup is a significant contribution.

 

This feature is a coming-of-age story about self-discovery, about coming to terms with the past and moving on to better things. The acting is terrific, the script is very heavy on drama and the viewing will most likely provide a moving experience.

 

 

The film is available to watch on Amazon Prime Video:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/video/detail/B09QGJST4B/ref=atv_dp_share_cu_r

About the Film Critic
Jason Knight
Jason Knight
Indie Feature Film, Digital / DVD Release, Amazon Prime