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Tomorrow's Today

Critic:

Jason Knight

|

Posted on:

14 Dec 2021

Film Reviews
Tomorrow's Today
Directed by:
Timothy Hines
Written by:
Frederick Stroppel, Susan Goforth, Sandy Chila
Starring:
Greg Kritikos, Joanne Scorcia, Annunziato Carbone, Dave Morrissey Jr., Heather Cole, Dominick Martini

A story about a group of people who unwillingly get involved with dangerous criminals and must find a way to get themselves out of trouble.

 

Charlie Boy (Kritikos) does stand-up comedy for a living and is quite popular in his neighbourhood. He gets along with people, goes to church and is trying to leave his criminal past behind. His friend Tommy G. (Carbone) is a wannabe actor who idolizes movie star Tom Hardy. Unfortunately, Tommy also has a gambling problem and when he gets himself into serious debt with gangsters, Charlie, along with his friend Joey ''Shakes'' (Morrissey), attempt to help Tommy out, leading to further complications.

 

This is a dark comedy crime drama that includes interesting characters and an intriguing plot. The main focus is on Charlie and the situations he and his friends get into and the script effectively explores the lives of the protagonists. The narrative contains themes of friendship, supporting each other, loss, grief and the pursuit of one's dreams. There is adult humour, criminals threatening people, a robbery, a kidnapping and there are also emotional scenes.

 

Kritikos leads the film well as well-meaning person, who is willing to help others and is suffering due to a terrible event that took place in his past. Carbone plays his part well as an optimistic individual dreaming of movie fame but ends up creating problems and Scorcia is convincing as a single mother who also has a tragic past. Martini is menacing as Big Angie, the leader of a gang of criminals.

 

The film contains wonderful establishing shots of New York City and several well-constructed montages that utilise fast motion and include shots various people and locations in New York, kind of like a documentary. The filmmakers also make limited use of black-and-white cinematography.

 

The soundtrack is rich, consisting of enjoyable tracks and the theme song Tomorrow's Today is a great addition.

 

This award-winning feature offers an entertaining experience that is not without its moving moments and the plot and characters are enough to gain the viewer's attention and approval.

About the Film Critic
Jason Knight
Jason Knight
Indie Feature Film